Utah Canyoneering 2008

Down to the Canyons of Utah
Each year we fall further under the spell of the spiritual spaces and beauty of the canyons and mesa.


A detailed gear list. [PDF file]


Morning light in a side canyon.


A spiritual haven:
spring pool and sunlit cathedral at the end of a side canyon.


Squeezing up a tight chimney in a slot canyon exit to the mesa.


A few hours from trail head the first day and temps are in the low 20's.


Alison climbs around a large and deep pothole in near freezing weather.


View from Trail Head across the mesa.


Canyon rim View down the Escalante.


Even mid-day the canyon walls can glow red. (Another view down the Escalante River.)


A small cactus garden in a near vertical sandstone wall.


View from our campsite high on the rim above the Escalante.


Evening Yoga on an outcrop above the river.


“Dead lizard water”
We camped on the canyon rim one night. All the ‘reliable’ large potholes in the area were bone dry. We found only one small and fermenting pothole with a decomposing lizard floating in it. The water was quite green and full of 'swimmers.' We strained it though a pack towel and used it. We had dead lizard pasta, dead lizard hot chocolate, and in the morning, dead lizard tea (where the water's taste was quite apparent). We were glad when we returned to the Escalante for fresher water.


Morning light at the entrance to a side canyon.


Canyon bottom travel can be tedious. Alison temporarily wading in the wash after a long stretch of bushwhacking in willows and tamarisk. Soon it will be up the bank and into more willows and tamarisk.


Getting across a very deep beaver pond. The logs are very springy and wobbly.
It takes both logs, both hands and your feet to keep from swimming.


Alison in a tight spot.


Cooking dinner above the wash.


Looking down canyon from the rim.


Another wonderful canyon rim campsite.


Entrance to a very dark and very narrow slot canyon.


Looking out the top of an intimate side canyon.


Enjoying the evening light on a high mesa perch.